Formal Mindfulness Practice versus Everyday Mindfulness

When you get up from your meditation cushion, take mindfulness with you

You don’t have to be sitting on a cushion to be practicing mindfulness meditation. You can actually incorporate mindfulness into your everyday activities. In fact, the goal of “formal” meditation practice, defined here as intentionally sitting with a tall spine, and focusing on your breath or another object for a discrete amount of time, is to have the benefits of the formal practice seep into your every day activities.

Formal practice has no other practical purpose than helping you become less reactive and more present to the ups and downs for daily living. Our goal at mindful hub is to help support you on your mindfulness journey. If you are feeling frustrated with your “formal” practice or if you haven’t started one yet, I can help by noticing mindfulness in the day-to-day. Start by taking a look at our new worksheet,Easy Ways to Integrate Mindfulness Into Your Day, then take a look at our other worksheets to see how they can benefit your mindfulness practice, and more importantly your satisfaction with daily life and your sense of well-being.

We wish you twenty minutes of mindfulness every day!

4 thoughts on “Formal Mindfulness Practice versus Everyday Mindfulness

  1. Counsellor Melbourne says:

    Thanks for the post and worksheet. I think intentionally practicing mindfulness during regular day (and night) activities is important, as well as establishing a formal meditation sitting.

    What do you find with clients are common ‘resistances’ to formal practice? I know for me I normally meditate for an hour every morning but lately have found excuses to neglect this at times. Why? I’m still not sure.

    Reminds me of so many clients who complain “I know XYZ (say a diet or exercise or whatever) is good for me, but I still don’t do it”.

    All the best,

    Adam

    1. mindfulhub says:

      Adam: A sign at our local music school reads “the more I practice, the more I want to practice. The less I practice, the less I want to practice.” I know when I fall off the mindfulness wagon, it’s usually because I forget how wonderful the benefits are – and I think this just leads to inertia.

  2. Counsellor Melbourne says:

    Thanks for the post and worksheet. I think intentionally practicing mindfulness during regular day (and night) activities is important, as well as establishing a formal meditation sitting.

    What do you find with clients are common ‘resistances’ to formal practice? I know for me I normally meditate for an hour every morning but lately have found excuses to neglect this at times. Why? I’m still not sure.

    Reminds me of so many clients who complain “I know XYZ (say a diet or exercise or whatever) is good for me, but I still don’t do it”.

    All the best,

    Adam

    1. mindfulhub says:

      Adam: A sign at our local music school reads “the more I practice, the more I want to practice. The less I practice, the less I want to practice.” I know when I fall off the mindfulness wagon, it’s usually because I forget how wonderful the benefits are – and I think this just leads to inertia.

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