Multitasking Madness – A Case for Unitasking

multitasking - not why shiva has so many arms

I really did this the other day: I picked up our house phone to call my husband at his office and at the same time, with my other hand, using my other ear, picked up my Iphone to check messages. Yup, that really happened.  It’s been one of those weeks where I should be donning a scarlet H on my bodice – H for hypocrite. The hypocrite who founded mindful hub.

But was I really doing two things at once? And at what cost? Brain researchers assert that we really can’t multitask and business gurus tell us that productivity dips as much as 40 percent when we try to multitask. Instead, what happens when we try to quickly switch from one task to the next is the brain becomes overwhelmed, fried.

We can think of our mindfulness practice as “unitasking” – taking time for mindfulness allows us to strengthen the part of the brain responsible for executive functioning, making it easier for us to slow down, and calmly choose one task at a time.

Just something to think about next time you find yourself with a phone at each ear.

How mindful were you this week?  Share your successes and failures (and remember there really aren’t any failures if you catch yourself being mindless).

Click here to learn mindfulness basics

We wish you twenty minutes of mindfulness every day!

11 thoughts on “Multitasking Madness – A Case for Unitasking

  1. Counselling Melbourne says:

    Donna I like this post! In our every changing complex world how true it is that technology intended to make our lives simpler just often makes us more stressed and mindless. Some good distinctions. BTW I wonder if you believe it is possible to train the mind to experience ever present non dual awareness during waking dreaming and deep sleep? In other words 24/7 mindfulness! Adam

  2. Counselling Melbourne says:

    Actually, I’m exploring the relationship between psychoanalysis and mindfulness in the clinical setting. With clients I encourage free association as a mindfulness practice, in addition to daily mindfulness training (anapana) between sessions. I am sometimes surprised with the rapidity of recovery of the repressed, enhanced emotion regulation and insight. In terms of developing ever present non-dual awareness, I think that’s part of what is meant by enlightenment or Nirvana, which is different to our aims clinically.

    1. mindfulhub says:

      Interesting – I think Nirvana means being your authentic self, in the present moment. Which can be achieved by the kind of therapy you do. Would you be interested in doing a guest post on this topic? Please leave us your website information.

      Donna

  3. Counselling Melbourne says:

    Actually, I’m exploring the relationship between psychoanalysis and mindfulness in the clinical setting. With clients I encourage free association as a mindfulness practice, in addition to daily mindfulness training (anapana) between sessions. I am sometimes surprised with the rapidity of recovery of the repressed, enhanced emotion regulation and insight. In terms of developing ever present non-dual awareness, I think that’s part of what is meant by enlightenment or Nirvana, which is different to our aims clinically.

    1. mindfulhub says:

      Interesting – I think Nirvana means being your authentic self, in the present moment. Which can be achieved by the kind of therapy you do. Would you be interested in doing a guest post on this topic? Please leave us your website information.

      Donna

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